8 Secrets LongHorn Steakhouse Doesn’t Want You To Know – Eat This, Not That

Today, there are approximately 565 LongHorn Steakhouse restaurants in over 40 states. The casual, meat-centric chain serves up steaks of all types at decent prices, and the menu is packed with sides, entrees, sandwiches, soups, salads, and desserts. Overall, people have a generally favorable opinion of LongHorn Steakhouse, and that holds true when compared to other similar restaurant chains, like Outback Steakhouse – in fact, a writer of Business Intern called LongHorn “better [than Outback] in every way but one”, this one being “fantastic service”. But before you order your next Renegade Sirloin Steak or Maverick Ribeye Sandwich, you might want to consider these eight The secrets of the LongHorn Steakhouse.

RELATED: 8 worst fast food burgers to avoid right now

CaptnGphs / Tripadvisor

LongHorn Steakhouse restaurants may have a strong Texas/Western theme, both in decor and menu, but the first location opened in Atlanta in 1981, a city about 675 miles from the eastern border of the US. Texas. And today, the state with the most locations of this Tex-Western restaurant is Florida, which has more than 70 restaurants.

woman in bookstore
Shutterstock

This first Atlanta LongHorn Steakhouse restaurant was established on a property that has quite a colorful history. According to Reference for Business, the building was once an antique shop, but before the sale to the steakhouse founders, it was more recently an X-rated adult “bookstore.”

RELATED: 8 Secret Steakhouses You Don’t Want You To Know

The Outlaw Rib Eye Steak
LongHorn Steakhouse / Facebook

Granted, you don’t dine at a steakhouse because you want the most nutritious food possible, but even when you head to LongHorn Steakhouse, there are entrees that are best headed for. One is the outlaw Ribeye. According to the chain’s own nutrition information, this 20-ounce steak contains 87 grams of total fat and 38 grams of saturated fat. On any given day, an adult should consume no more than 22 grams of saturated fat, per Cleveland Clinic.

dart business
Shutterstock

LongHorn Steakhouse may love cultivating a friendly neighborhood vibe, but behind the scenes, the story is anything but. The chain is owned by Darden Restaurants, a huge company with over 195,000 employees. Darden also operates Red Lobster, Capital Grille and Olive Garden.

longhorn steakhouse
Shutterstock

According to Mental Floss, the first LongHorn Steakhouse was almost the last, and short-lived. Founder George McKerrow Jr. was physically scattered building the restaurant interior, cooking, cleaning, and serving — and he was losing money. Only a freak three-day snowstorm that left motorists stranded near the restaurant saved the place, as McKerrow lured them in with an offer of cheap drinks, and word of mouth spread through the after.

crime scene
Shutterstock

In early summer 2019, a LongHorn Steakhouse in Tennessee was the scene of a fatal crime. According to FOX17, two men were gunned down in the parking lot of a LongHorn Steakhouse in Clarksville, Tennessee, as several shocked innocent bystanders looked on. A man nicknamed “Hulk” was later arrested for the murders after turning himself in.

RELATED: 5 Worst Steakhouse Chain Orders To Avoid Right Now

longhorn steakhouse chili cheese fries
LongHorn Steakhouse / Facebook

While you probably wouldn’t eat an entire plate of LongHorn Steakhouse Chili Cheese Fries, the appetizer stats are still shocking. A single order of these fries contains 1,960 calories, 122 grams of fat (54 grams of saturated fat), and 3,160 milligrams of blood pressure-raising sodium.

longhorn steakhouse employee
LongHorn Steakhouse / Facebook

According to ClassAction.org, LongHorn Steakhouse has a long history of underpaying its workers. How? By asking tipped workers (waiters, for example) to perform tasks that were not part of their job description without a pay raise, the restaurant was essentially paying the workers less than minimum wage for their efforts. The company also reportedly began applying a tip credit, treating gratuities as wages paid, without informing employees.

RELATED: 11 Secrets Texas Roadhouse Doesn’t Want You To Know

Steven John

Steven John is a freelance writer for Eat this, not that! based just outside New York. Read more